Culture

Selena Gomez has opened up about her daily therapy sessions in her first cover shoot for American Vogue.

The 24-year-old singer opened up about her treatment and her recent stay in a Tennessee rehabilitation facility after she announced she was taking an indefinite break from her world tour. The Come and Get It singer was diagnosed with lupus in 2014, and entered the facility in order to focus on getting well.

Since her re-emergence into the spotlight, she has appeared at the American Music Awards and debuted her budding romance with singer The Weeknd. And in the interview with US Vogue the singer spoke up about her love of therapy, and the pressure on girls these days to be “too resilient”.

“DBT (Dialectical Behaviour Therapy) has completely changed my life,” she gushed to the publication, revealing she sees her therapist five days a week. “I wish more people would talk about therapy. We girls, we’re taught to be almost too resilient, to be strong and sexy and cool and laid-back, the girl who’s down. We also need to feel allowed to fall apart.”

Selena admitted her stint in rehab came after she was struggling with loneliness, depression and anxiety while on tour, and felt as though she was letting her fans down.

“My self-esteem was shot. I was depressed, anxious. I started to have panic attacks right before getting onstage, or right after leaving the stage,” she shared. “Basically I felt I wasn’t good enough, wasn’t capable. I felt I wasn’t giving my fans anything, and they could see it – which, I think, was a complete distortion.”

Part of Selena’s journey to wellness included ditching her phone for the whole 90 day stay, before the singer flew to Tennessee and joined a small group of other young women in the program taking part in individual therapy sessions and group therapy, according to the publication.

“You have no idea how incredible it felt to just be with six girls, real people who couldn’t give two s**ts about who I was, who were fighting for their lives,” she smiled. “It was one of the hardest things I’ve done, but it was the best thing I’ve done.”

Selena Gomez has opened up about her daily therapy sessions in her first cover shoot for American Vogue.

The 24-year-old singer opened up about her treatment and her recent stay in a Tennessee rehabilitation facility after she announced she was taking an indefinite break from her world tour. The Come and Get It singer was diagnosed with lupus in 2014, and entered the facility in order to focus on getting well.

Since her re-emergence into the spotlight, she has appeared at the American Music Awards and debuted her budding romance with singer The Weeknd. And in the interview with US Vogue the singer spoke up about her love of therapy, and the pressure on girls these days to be “too resilient”.

“DBT (Dialectical Behaviour Therapy) has completely changed my life,” she gushed to the publication, revealing she sees her therapist five days a week. “I wish more people would talk about therapy. We girls, we’re taught to be almost too resilient, to be strong and sexy and cool and laid-back, the girl who’s down. We also need to feel allowed to fall apart.”

Selena admitted her stint in rehab came after she was struggling with loneliness, depression and anxiety while on tour, and felt as though she was letting her fans down.

“My self-esteem was shot. I was depressed, anxious. I started to have panic attacks right before getting onstage, or right after leaving the stage,” she shared. “Basically I felt I wasn’t good enough, wasn’t capable. I felt I wasn’t giving my fans anything, and they could see it – which, I think, was a complete distortion.”

Part of Selena’s journey to wellness included ditching her phone for the whole 90 day stay, before the singer flew to Tennessee and joined a small group of other young women in the program taking part in individual therapy sessions and group therapy, according to the publication.

“You have no idea how incredible it felt to just be with six girls, real people who couldn’t give two s**ts about who I was, who were fighting for their lives,” she smiled. “It was one of the hardest things I’ve done, but it was the best thing I’ve done.”

 

-Via Music-News

Photo Credit: InStyle UK

A man obsessed with Taylor Swift has been arrested for stalking after allegedly climbing on the roof of her New York penthouse.

Mohammed Jaffar, 29, first attempted to meet the Shake It Off singer last December (16), when he arrived at Swift’s apartment and requested a meeting with her, and was told to leave, according to a criminal complaint obtained by the New York Post’s gossip column Page Six.

But Jaffar was undeterred, and turned up at Swift’s flat a further four times over the next two months, and managed to enter the building on 6 February (17). CCTV footage allegedly caught him in the hallway directly outside Swift’s apartment door, and also on the roof of the building from 10am to 2pm that day. On another occasion, Jaffar rang Swift’s doorbell for an hour straight, before returning the next day and ringing it again for a further 45 minutes.

His most recent attempt to meet Swift at the apartment reportedly took place on 15 February (17).

Jaffar’s campaign to meet Swift allegedly extended to him calling the singer’s management company 59 times between 27 January and 16 February (17) demanding to be put in touch with her.

Jaffar was arrested on 6 March (17) on stalking and burglary charges and was held on a $20,000 (£16,000) bond. Judge David Frey signed off on an order of protection against Jaffar, which prevents him from making any contact with the singer.

Swift purchased her $20 million (£16 million) penthouse in 2014, and counts stars including Orlando Bloom and director Steven Soderbergh among her neighbours.

Jaffar is the latest person to be arrested for stalking Swift. In November (16), Frank Andrew Hoover, 39, reportedly attempted to corner the Blank Space star and get a photograph of her as she made her way to a private jet following a show in Austin, Texas, in October (16).

He was arrested for breaking the terms of a lifetime restraining order, which forbids him from coming within 500 feet (152 metres) of Swift.

A TV chat became awkward for Jennifer Lopez on Wednesday when she was asked if rapper Drake had proposed to her.

The Love Don’t Cost a Thing singer has been coy about the status of her relationship with the rapper after appearing alongside him in a very revealing social media snapshot amid reports the two stars were an item.

Drake, who also attended two of Lopez’s residency gigs in Las Vegas in early December (16) and hosted an intimate party she attended, reportedly surprised the 47-year-old with a $100,000 (£82,000) diamond necklace from Tiffany & Co., which Jennifer showed off in an Instagram photo from her New Year’s Eve (31Dec16) celebrations.

However, amid reports the pair had taken a step back from each other, Lopez appeared on U.S. late night show Watch What Happens Live! and was quizzed about her dating life.

After revealing she had received five marriage proposals in her life, host Andy Cohen asked her who she turned down. Before she could answer her Shades of Blue co-star Ray Liotta said, “Drake, right?'”

The red-faced singer and actress refused to answer the question, replying, “Oh my God,” while laughing and covering her face.

Jennifer has since reportedly moved on from her Drake romance with former baseball player Alex Rodriguez.

“They have been dating for a few weeks,” a source told People.com earlier this week (beg06Mar17). “Jennifer seems excited. He has been around her family and she really likes that he is a dad.”

The reported couple has yet to comment on the romance rumours, but Lopez was previously married to Ojani Noa, Chris Judd, and Marc Anthony, who she shares nine-year-old twins Max and Emme with. She was also engaged to actor Ben Affleck.

Beyonce, Madonna, and Coldplay are leading calls for gender equality by signing an open letter for the Global Citizen organisation on International Women’s Day.

Stars including Salma Hayek, John Legend, Julia Roberts, Jada Pinkett Smith, Freida Pinto, and Dakota Johnson have also added their signatures to the note, which aims to rally support for the cause.

The message, which also highlights Global Citizen’s partnership with Beyonce and Salma’s Chime for Change charity, underlines the “emergency” need for action, particularly in light of new U.S. President Donald Trump’s controversial policies regarding immigration and women’s health and reproductive rights.

“We have reached a critical moment in history,” the letter begins. “Recent legislation and rhetoric have put decades of progress for girls and women at risk…

“All over the world, women are on the frontlines fighting for our future. Yet millions of girls and women are still denied basic equal rights. And recent policies and appointments in the United States jeopardize its position as a global leader and positive role model on human rights.”

The note continues, “We stand together to say, in a voice louder than ever, that fighting for gender equality is the emergency and the opportunity of our time. With every generation, our story has spread wider, become more familiar. The voices telling it braver, more powerful. But our story is far from over.

“This is about hearing a call – to join us wherever you are. About raising an alarm – drawing attention where there is work to be done. And about celebrating – those who are already showing us, against impossible odds, what is possible.”

The stars go on to insist “every voice matters”, explaining, “Each one of us is needed to achieve change. We believe we can do extraordinary things when we come together.”

Concluding the letter, they declare: “We fight for education. For health. For justice. For every girl. Every woman. Everywhere. We fight for our future. Because none of us can move forward if half of us are held back.

“Join us, and take action for gender equality at globalcitizen.org/IWD2017”.

The rallying call was released on Wednesday (08Mar17), as people around the world staged demonstrations to champion women’s rights and others, including actress Jessica Chastain, took part in strikes in support of the A Day Without A Woman protest to mark International Women’s Day.

American officials are worried that 50,000 Russian troops being massed near the Ukraine border and within Crimea, the pro-Russian peninsula recently annexed by President Vladimir Putin, aren’t there for just a training exercise

Despite Russian reassurances that Moscow’s troop buildup along Ukraine’s eastern frontier is for a military exercise, its growing scale is making U.S. officials nervous about its ultimate aim.

President Barack Obama on Friday urged Russia to stop “intimidating” Ukraine and to pull its troops back to “de-escalate the situation.” He told CBS that the troop buildup may “be an effort to intimidate Ukraine, or it may be that [Russia has] additional plans.”

Pentagon officials say they believe there could be close to 50,000 Russian troops bordering the former Soviet republic and inside Crimea, recently seized and annexed by Moscow. That estimate is double earlier assessments, and means Russian President Vladimir Putin could order a lighting strike into Ukrainian territory with the forces already in place. The higher troop count was first reported by the Wall Street Journal.

“We continue to see the Russian military reinforce units on their side of the border with Ukraine to the south and to the east of Ukraine,” Rear Admiral John Kirby, the Pentagon spokesman, said Thursday. “They continue to reinforce and it continues to be unclear exactly what the intent there is.”

State Department spokeswoman Marie Harf played down the notion that there are as many as 100,000 Russian troops now bordering Ukraine, as Olexander Motsyk, the Ukrainian ambassador to the U.S., said Thursday on Capitol Hill. “I hadn’t actually seen the hundred-thousand number,” Harf said. “There are huge numbers of Russian troops on the Ukrainian border. … We are concerned about Russia taking further escalatory steps with whatever number of tens of thousands of troops they have there, and have called on them not to do so.”

Washington got those assurances that the Russian troop buildup was only an exercise from Russian Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu a week ago. But no one in the U.S. government knows if Putin agrees — or if the Russian leader has changed his mind as the West has debated what level of economic and political sanctions might be imposed if Moscow takes an additional chunk of Ukraine beyond Crimea. “They made it clear that their intent was to do exercises and not to cross the border,” Kirby said. “Our expectation is they’re going to live up to that word.”

There is no plan to involve the U.S. military in what is happening in Ukraine, even if Russia takes more territory. Ukraine borders Russia, and Ukraine does not belong to NATO, where an attack on one member is deemed to be an attack on all.

“Should the Russians continue to move aggressively in that region and in the Ukraine, what does that mean—and NATO would have to respond, for example—what would that mean for the United States Army?” Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, asked the Army’s top officer Thursday.

“My responsibility is to make sure that the U.S. Army is prepared to respond as part of a joint force, as part of NATO,” General Ray Odierno, the Army chief of staff, responded. “So what I’m focused on is improving our readiness in combat, combat service support and combat aviation capabilities to make sure we’re ready to respond whether it’s from a humanitarian assistance aspect or any other aspect.”

American officials are worried that 50,000 Russian troops being massed near the Ukraine border and within Crimea, the pro-Russian peninsula recently annexed by President Vladimir Putin, aren’t there for just a training exercise

Despite Russian reassurances that Moscow’s troop buildup along Ukraine’s eastern frontier is for a military exercise, its growing scale is making U.S. officials nervous about its ultimate aim.

President Barack Obama on Friday urged Russia to stop “intimidating” Ukraine and to pull its troops back to “de-escalate the situation.” He told CBS that the troop buildup may “be an effort to intimidate Ukraine, or it may be that [Russia has] additional plans.”

Pentagon officials say they believe there could be close to 50,000 Russian troops bordering the former Soviet republic and inside Crimea, recently seized and annexed by Moscow. That estimate is double earlier assessments, and means Russian President Vladimir Putin could order a lighting strike into Ukrainian territory with the forces already in place. The higher troop count was first reported by the Wall Street Journal.

“We continue to see the Russian military reinforce units on their side of the border with Ukraine to the south and to the east of Ukraine,” Rear Admiral John Kirby, the Pentagon spokesman, said Thursday. “They continue to reinforce and it continues to be unclear exactly what the intent there is.”

State Department spokeswoman Marie Harf played down the notion that there are as many as 100,000 Russian troops now bordering Ukraine, as Olexander Motsyk, the Ukrainian ambassador to the U.S., said Thursday on Capitol Hill. “I hadn’t actually seen the hundred-thousand number,” Harf said. “There are huge numbers of Russian troops on the Ukrainian border. … We are concerned about Russia taking further escalatory steps with whatever number of tens of thousands of troops they have there, and have called on them not to do so.”

Washington got those assurances that the Russian troop buildup was only an exercise from Russian Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu a week ago. But no one in the U.S. government knows if Putin agrees — or if the Russian leader has changed his mind as the West has debated what level of economic and political sanctions might be imposed if Moscow takes an additional chunk of Ukraine beyond Crimea. “They made it clear that their intent was to do exercises and not to cross the border,” Kirby said. “Our expectation is they’re going to live up to that word.”

There is no plan to involve the U.S. military in what is happening in Ukraine, even if Russia takes more territory. Ukraine borders Russia, and Ukraine does not belong to NATO, where an attack on one member is deemed to be an attack on all.

“Should the Russians continue to move aggressively in that region and in the Ukraine, what does that mean—and NATO would have to respond, for example—what would that mean for the United States Army?” Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, asked the Army’s top officer Thursday.

Three people have died in clashes in the Ukrainian capital on Wednesday, according to medics on the site, in a development that will likely escalate Ukraine’s two-month political crisis.
Inna Goodman
Senior Writer

Despite Russian reassurances that Moscow’s troop buildup along Ukraine’s eastern frontier is for a military exercise, its growing scale is making U.S. officials nervous about its ultimate aim.
President Barack Obama on Friday urged Russia to stop “intimidating” Ukraine and to pull its troops back to “de-escalate the situation.” He told CBS that the troop buildup may “be an effort to intimidate Ukraine, or it may be that [Russia has] additional plans.”
Pentagon officials say they believe there could be close to 50,000 Russian troops bordering the former Soviet republic and inside Crimea, recently seized and annexed by Moscow. That estimate is double earlier assessments, and means Russian President Vladimir Putin could order a lighting strike into Ukrainian territory with the forces already in place. The higher troop count was first reported by the Wall Street Journal.
“We continue to see the Russian military reinforce units on their side of the border with Ukraine to the south and to the east of Ukraine,” Rear Admiral John Kirby, the Pentagon spokesman,
American officials are worried that 50,000 Russian troops being massed near the Ukraine border and within Crimea, the pro-Russian peninsula recently annexed by President Vladimir Putin, aren’t there 
beauty-fashion-model-girl-with-hat-wide

The man with the most influential haircut in Britain is not David Beckham.

Despite Russian reassurances that Moscow’s troop buildup along Ukraine’s eastern frontier is for a military exercise, its growing scale is making U.S. officials nervous about its ultimate aim.
President Barack Obama on Friday urged Russia to stop “intimidating” Ukraine and to pull its troops back to “de-escalate the situation.” He told CBS that the troop buildup may “be an effort to intimidate Ukraine, or it may be that [Russia has] additional plans.”
Pentagon officials say they believe there could be close to 50,000 Russian troops bordering the former Soviet republic and inside Crimea, recently seized and annexed by Moscow. That estimate is double earlier assessments, and means Russian President Vladimir Putin could order a lighting strike into Ukrainian territory with the forces already in place. The higher troop count was first reported by the Wall Street Journal.
“We continue to see the Russian military reinforce units on their side of the border with Ukraine to the south and to the east of Ukraine,” Rear Admiral John Kirby, the Pentagon spokesman.

American officials are worried that 50,000 Russian troops being massed near the Ukraine border and within Crimea, the pro-Russian peninsula recently annexed by President Vladimir Putin, aren’t there for just a training exercise

Despite Russian reassurances that Moscow’s troop buildup along Ukraine’s eastern frontier is for a military exercise, its growing scale is making U.S. officials nervous about its ultimate aim.

President Barack Obama on Friday urged Russia to stop “intimidating” Ukraine and to pull its troops back to “de-escalate the situation.” He told CBS that the troop buildup may “be an effort to intimidate Ukraine, or it may be that [Russia has] additional plans.”

Pentagon officials say they believe there could be close to 50,000 Russian troops bordering the former Soviet republic and inside Crimea, recently seized and annexed by Moscow. That estimate is double earlier assessments, and means Russian President Vladimir Putin could order a lighting strike into Ukrainian territory with the forces already in place. The higher troop count was first reported by the Wall Street Journal.

“We continue to see the Russian military reinforce units on their side of the border with Ukraine to the south and to the east of Ukraine,” Rear Admiral John Kirby, the Pentagon spokesman, said Thursday. “They continue to reinforce and it continues to be unclear exactly what the intent there is.”

Revolution in Ukraine 2014. Kiev Protesters Killed as Ukraine Crisis Escalates
Revolution in Ukraine 2014. Kiev Protesters Killed as Ukraine Crisis Escalates

State Department spokeswoman Marie Harf played down the notion that there are as many as 100,000 Russian troops now bordering Ukraine, as Olexander Motsyk, the Ukrainian ambassador to the U.S., said Thursday on Capitol Hill. “I hadn’t actually seen the hundred-thousand number,”

Harf said. “There are huge numbers of Russian troops on the Ukrainian border. … We are concerned about Russia taking further escalatory steps with whatever number of tens of thousands of troops they have there, and have called on them not to do so.”

Washington got those assurances that the Russian troop buildup was only an exercise from Russian Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu a week ago. But no one in the U.S. government knows if Putin agrees — or if the Russian leader has changed his mind as the West has debated what level of economic and political sanctions might be imposed if Moscow takes an additional chunk of Ukraine beyond Crimea. “They made it clear that their intent was to do exercises and not to cross the border,” Kirby said. “Our expectation is they’re going to live up to that word.”

State Department spokeswoman Marie Harf

There is no plan to involve the U.S. military in what is happening in Ukraine, even if Russia takes more territory. Ukraine borders Russia, and Ukraine does not belong to NATO, where an attack on one member is deemed to be an attack on all.

“Should the Russians continue to move aggressively in that region and in the Ukraine, what does that mean—and NATO would have to respond, for example—what would that mean for the United States Army?” Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, asked the Army’s top officer Thursday.

How many of the 67,000 U.S. troops in Europe might be involved? “I simply don’t know,” Odierno said. “And I would just remind people that, actually, some of the soldiers that are assigned to Europe actually right now are in Afghanistan.”

“My responsibility is to make sure that the U.S. Army is prepared to respond as part of a joint force, as part of NATO,” General Ray Odierno, the Army chief of staff, responded. “So what I’m focused on is improving our readiness in combat, combat service support and combat aviation capabilities to make sure we’re ready to respond whether it’s from a humanitarian assistance aspect or any other aspect.”

From Moscow to Siberia to Bulgaria, Russian war monuments have faced a rough year.

As a result of all this, two important things happened. First, Ukraine became a country in a meaningful way. In the 23 years since it became independent from the USSR, Ukraine could not decide whether it was going to become a law-abiding, European nation of shopkeepers like its Western neighbor (and some-time ruler), Poland – or take its place alongside Belarus and Kazakhstan in a revived Russian Empire of kleptocratic dictatorships.

Lawmakers suggested that the world is abandoning Ukraine. “It appears to me Ukraine was left defenseless over the last two decades,” said Rep. Marcy Kaptur, D-Ohio.

Vladimir Putin settled that question once and for all. Without the Russian-speaking population of Crimea, Donetsk and Lugansk, there will never again be a pro-Moscow government in Kiev. At the end of October strongly pro-European parties swept to power in the Rada, Ukraine’s parliament. At the same time the European Union and Nato found – for the time being at least – the mettle to agree on sanctions in Russia and economic and logistical support for Ukraine.

The war for the East continues. The economy teeters. The ultra-nationalists may not have done well in recent elections but they are armed and organized into self-governing “patriotic battalions” fighting independently of the government’s command. A recipe for disaster of Yugoslav proportions, perhaps. And yet most Ukrainians remain surprisingly hopeful. “We found out who we are. And who are aren’t,” says Ruslana Khazipova, a young singer with the band Dakh Daughters. “We are free. And we aren’t Russia’s bitch any more.”

American officials are worried that 50,000 Russian troops being massed near the Ukraine border and within Crimea, the pro-Russian peninsula recently annexed by President Vladimir Putin, aren’t there for just a training exercise

Despite Russian reassurances that Moscow’s troop buildup along Ukraine’s eastern frontier is for a military exercise, its growing scale is making U.S. officials nervous about its ultimate aim.

President Barack Obama on Friday urged Russia to stop “intimidating” Ukraine and to pull its troops back to “de-escalate the situation.” He told CBS that the troop buildup may “be an effort to intimidate Ukraine, or it may be that [Russia has] additional plans.”

Pentagon officials say they believe there could be close to 50,000 Russian troops bordering the former Soviet republic and inside Crimea, recently seized and annexed by Moscow. That estimate is double earlier assessments, and means Russian President Vladimir Putin could order a lighting strike into Ukrainian territory with the forces already in place. The higher troop count was first reported by the Wall Street Journal.

“We continue to see the Russian military reinforce units on their side of the border with Ukraine to the south and to the east of Ukraine,” Rear Admiral John Kirby, the Pentagon spokesman, said Thursday. “They continue to reinforce and it continues to be unclear exactly what the intent there is.”

Revolution in Ukraine 2014. Kiev Protesters Killed as Ukraine Crisis Escalates
Revolution in Ukraine 2014. Kiev Protesters Killed as Ukraine Crisis Escalates

State Department spokeswoman Marie Harf played down the notion that there are as many as 100,000 Russian troops now bordering Ukraine, as Olexander Motsyk, the Ukrainian ambassador to the U.S., said Thursday on Capitol Hill. “I hadn’t actually seen the hundred-thousand number,”

Harf said. “There are huge numbers of Russian troops on the Ukrainian border. … We are concerned about Russia taking further escalatory steps with whatever number of tens of thousands of troops they have there, and have called on them not to do so.”

Washington got those assurances that the Russian troop buildup was only an exercise from Russian Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu a week ago. But no one in the U.S. government knows if Putin agrees — or if the Russian leader has changed his mind as the West has debated what level of economic and political sanctions might be imposed if Moscow takes an additional chunk of Ukraine beyond Crimea. “They made it clear that their intent was to do exercises and not to cross the border,” Kirby said. “Our expectation is they’re going to live up to that word.”

State Department spokeswoman Marie Harf

There is no plan to involve the U.S. military in what is happening in Ukraine, even if Russia takes more territory. Ukraine borders Russia, and Ukraine does not belong to NATO, where an attack on one member is deemed to be an attack on all.

“Should the Russians continue to move aggressively in that region and in the Ukraine, what does that mean—and NATO would have to respond, for example—what would that mean for the United States Army?” Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, asked the Army’s top officer Thursday.

How many of the 67,000 U.S. troops in Europe might be involved? “I simply don’t know,” Odierno said. “And I would just remind people that, actually, some of the soldiers that are assigned to Europe actually right now are in Afghanistan.”

“My responsibility is to make sure that the U.S. Army is prepared to respond as part of a joint force, as part of NATO,” General Ray Odierno, the Army chief of staff, responded. “So what I’m focused on is improving our readiness in combat, combat service support and combat aviation capabilities to make sure we’re ready to respond whether it’s from a humanitarian assistance aspect or any other aspect.”

From Moscow to Siberia to Bulgaria, Russian war monuments have faced a rough year.

As a result of all this, two important things happened. First, Ukraine became a country in a meaningful way. In the 23 years since it became independent from the USSR, Ukraine could not decide whether it was going to become a law-abiding, European nation of shopkeepers like its Western neighbor (and some-time ruler), Poland – or take its place alongside Belarus and Kazakhstan in a revived Russian Empire of kleptocratic dictatorships.

Lawmakers suggested that the world is abandoning Ukraine. “It appears to me Ukraine was left defenseless over the last two decades,” said Rep. Marcy Kaptur, D-Ohio.

Vladimir Putin settled that question once and for all. Without the Russian-speaking population of Crimea, Donetsk and Lugansk, there will never again be a pro-Moscow government in Kiev. At the end of October strongly pro-European parties swept to power in the Rada, Ukraine’s parliament. At the same time the European Union and Nato found – for the time being at least – the mettle to agree on sanctions in Russia and economic and logistical support for Ukraine.

The war for the East continues. The economy teeters. The ultra-nationalists may not have done well in recent elections but they are armed and organized into self-governing “patriotic battalions” fighting independently of the government’s command. A recipe for disaster of Yugoslav proportions, perhaps. And yet most Ukrainians remain surprisingly hopeful. “We found out who we are. And who are aren’t,” says Ruslana Khazipova, a young singer with the band Dakh Daughters. “We are free. And we aren’t Russia’s bitch any more.”

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